Publication: “Shrink Wrapping Cells in a Defined Extracellular Matrix to Modulate the Chemo-Mechanical Microenvironment”

Rachelle, John and Amrita are co-first authors on our latest publication on “Shrink Wrapping Cells in a Defined Extracellular Matrix to Modulate the Chemo-Mechanical Microenvironment” published in the Journal of Cellular and Molecular Bioengineering.  This article is part of the 2014 Young Innovator issue and the work will be presented at the 2014 Biomedical Engineering Society meeting in October as part of the Young Innovator Symposium.

Publication: “Nano- and Microstructured ECM and Biomimetic Scaffolds for Cardiac Tissue Engineering”

We have published a chapter titled Nano- and Microstructured ECM and Biomimetic Scaffolds for Cardiac Tissue Engineering in the book Bio-inspired Materials for Biomedical Engineering edited by Tony Brennan and Chelsea Kirschner. Co-authors are Quentin Jallerat, John Szymanski and Adam Feinberg.  This book covers the latest bio-inspired materials synthesis techniques and biomedical applications that are advancing the field of tissue engineering.

Publication: “Functional Differences in Engineered Myocardium from Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived versus Neonatal Cardiomyocytes”

Prof. Feinberg is the lead author on a new publication in the journal Stem Cell Reports describing the functional comparison of cardiac muscle engineered from neonatal mouse cardiomyocytes versus cardiomyocytes derived from mouse embryonic stem cells.  The study highlights the functional immaturity of stem cell derived cardiomyocytes in terms of electrophysiology and contractility at the tissue scale.

“Functional Differences in Engineered Myocardium from Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived versus Neonatal Cardiomyocytes”

Publication: A tissue-engineered jellyfish with biomimetic propulsion

Prof. Feinberg is a coauthor on a new publication in Nature Biotechnology on the tissue engineering of a synthetic organism, an artificial “jellyfish.”  This work was led by PhD student Janna Nawroth at Caltech and a collaboration of scientists from Caltech and Harvard.  This is a fantastic example of how simple components (an elastic sheet and muscle cells) can be combined to enable the emergence of complex swimming behavior that mimics really jellyfish.

 

Read more:
Go to the paper at Nature Biotechnology
Harvard press release
Nature news release
Discover Magazine article